Posts Tagged ‘curry’

If you’ve got potatoes, green beans, and eggplant…

Apologies once again for the ridiculous lapse in posting.  It’s not that I haven’t been cooking, I’ve just been busy putting together term paper research, outlines, etc.  I have, however, totally remembered to take pictures of this food I haven’t blogged about all this time. So get ready for this:

These two dishes were actually made on two consecutive nights, but since I cook for an army and always have leftovers, the second night meant MORE variety on my dinner plate. Hooray!

Dish #1: A rather simple dish of spiced up, roasted potatoes and green beans

  • 1-2 tbsp (or as much as you’d like) Olive Oil
  • Salt
  • Chili powder – My mom blends her own, but you can also buy it in the spice section of any major grocery store.
  • Turmeric
  • Mustard seeds
  • Cumin seeds
  • Urad Dahl
  • 1 large potato, chopped in cubes
  • Equivalent volume of green beans. I used the frozen cut green beans in this one, because I always have a variety of frozen vegetables on hand. If the supermarket allows, you can use fresh green beans and  cut them into thirds or quarters.
  • Cilantro, for garnish
  1. Heat olive oil on a pan and add the mustard seeds, urad dahl and cumin. When the mustard seeds start popping add the potatoes and make sure to coat them evenly in the oil.
  2. When the potatoes are 1/3 of the way cooked (you can tell by the color of the potatoes),  add the green beans.
  3. potatoes

  4. Add turmeric and salt (approx. 1/4 tsp of each)
  5. Cook on medium heat until the potatoes are fully cooked. By this time, the green beans will be cooked too.
  6. Add chili powder, salt to taste and mix thoroughly.

cooked

Dish #2: Eggplant Curry, more commonly known in India as Baingan Bharta, altered from this recipe.

  • 1 large eggplant, chopped in cubes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced in semicircles
  • 1 tablespoon ginger garlic paste (Or 1.5 tsp of ginger paste and 1.5 tsp of garlic paste)
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • 1 fresh jalapeño pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 bunch cilantro, finely chopped
  1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Mix in cumin seeds and onion. Cook and stir until onion is tender.
  3. Mix ginger garlic paste, curry powder, and tomato into the saucepan, and cook about 1 minute.
  4. Stir in yogurt. Mix in eggplant and jalapeno pepper, and season with salt.
  5. Cover, and cook 10 minutes over high heat.
  6. Remove cover, reduce heat to low, and continue cooking about 5 minutes, or until eggplant is fully cooked.
  7. Garnish with cilantro to serve

dinnnerhs

As always, dinner was served with two chapathis, instead of rice for two reasons. First, my mom made me a bunch of delicious chapathis and I’ll take every opportunity to eat them, and second, I like chapathis better than rice. Of course, these two dishes can be eaten with rice. I recommend Basmati rice or a long-grain rice.

Enjoy!

Advertisements

Channa Masala (Chole) Variation

My mom is the greatest chef in the world. It is official. Because she is the greatest chef in the world, she has these magical amazing recipes. So I took her recipe for channa masala and made it for dinner tonight. It involves a blender. Need I say more?

I forgot to take a picture – but the masala, when you’re done blending it, should be an orangey-reddish color. Less red, more orange, slightly pink. Coral?

Channa Masala

In blender, grind together:

  • 1/2 cup channa (a.k.a. chickpeas, garbanzo beans)
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 inch ginger root
  • Fresh & dried chili
  • Some jeera (cumin seeds)
  • Some somp (looks like cumin seeds, but they’re green)
  • Piece of coconut
  • Poppy seeds
  • 1/2 small Onion
  • Brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup tomato paste
  • 1-2 cups water

Other ingredients:

  • 1 large potato, diced to size of chickpease
  • 1-2 cans garbanzo beans
  • Onion, diced
  • Several cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 inch ginger root, sliced
  • Tomato, diced
  • Salt
  • Garam masala
  • Coriander (cilantro)
  • Turmeric
  • Cinnamon stick
  1. In a large saucepan, fry minced garlic, sliced ginger, onion, cinnamon, and salt.
  2. As onions are finished cooking, add the potato & turmeric.
  3. Add the tomato when potatoes are halfway cooked.
  4. When the potatoes are fully cooked, add channa, salt, and garam masala.
  5. Add masala from blender into saucepan, a little at a time. Don’t add too much.
  6. Freeze extra masala.
  7. Serve with chapathis, naan, or rice.

ENJOY!

I know this is the second channa masala recipe I’ve posted (here’s the first), but that just shows that there are many variations to the same dish. Have you ever made chole/channa masala? How do you make it?

Green Plantain Curry

I’ve made dinner several times and forgotten to take pictures… again. However, I made lunch yesterday AND remembered to take pictures!

plantains

Now, this plate looks nice, with 2 vegetable dishes and chapathis (an Indian bread). The chapathi recipe is my mother’s secret, and thus I cannot divulge it, but I’m sure you’ll be able to find many good recipes online if you Google it. No, I’m serious. To eat with the chapathi, I made Green Pepper curry, the recipe for which will come another day, and Green Plantain Curry.

Star Market is full of green plantains, which means, everyone upon reading this recipe, should go buy some plantains and make this dish.

Green Plantain Curry (Approx. 5 servings)

  • 2 large Green Plantains, diced into cubes
  • Dry Coconut
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 inch Ginger root
  • 1 tsp. Chilli powder
  • Salt, lemon/lime
  • Brown Sugar
  • Curry leaves & coriander

Frying Ingredients*

  • Olive Oil (Coconut Oil if you want to be more authentic)
  • 1 tsp. Mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp. Urad Daal (available at Shaws sometimes, definitely available at Allston Market or Shalimar in Central Sq.)
  • Pinch of Asafoetida Powder
  1. Make masala (powder) from dry coconut, brown sugar, garlic, ginger & chilli powder in a blender.
  2. Cut plantains into cubes after pressure cooking with skin on in, cut in halves, in a bowl of water.
  3. Put a generous amount of oil in a pan on low flame, and wait for the oil to heat up.
  4. Add frying ingredients and curry leaves, and wait for the mustard seeds to start sputtering/popping.
  5. Then, add plantains, coating all of it with oil
  6. Once the plantains have been cooked, turn off the stove if it is electric. (If it is gas, leave it on).
  7. Add the masala and mix thoroughly so all the plantains are coated.
  8. Remove from flame, add salt, lemon, & coriander.

Serve with chapathis or jasmine rice. Enjoy!

*I specified frying ingredients so in the future, when I reference it, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.

No, You DON’T Need Chicken Broth to Make Soup, Thanks.

Every time I walk into Panera Bread, I look up at the menu and die a little on the inside because all I want is Broccoli Cheddar Soup, but of course, it’s made with chicken broth. Tell me why they can’t make it with vegetable broth?  Some of my friends like to tell me that the taste is significantly improved with the stewed dead animal base, but I will never be able to judge for myself.

When I was in Geneva last spring, I found myself thinking, What should I make for dinner? I have… broccoli. And cheese. OH HEY. Broccoli Cheddar Soup. Okay, so it may have been Broccoli Gruyère Soup, but Gruyère is better than cheddar anyway (and it IS available at Star Market in the imported/specialty cheese sections.  It’s a bit pricey, $20/lb, so I don’t really recommend adding it to your weekly/bi-monthly grocery list.)

Here’s the recipe for Panera’s Broccoli Cheddar Soup, altered to account for my vegetarianism:

Vegetarian Broccoli Cheddar Soup (Substitute Gruyère in same quantity if you’re feeling international)

  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1/2 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1/2 pound fresh broccoli
  • 1 cup carrots, julienned
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 8 ounces grated sharp cheddar

Directions:

Saute onion in butter. Set aside. Cook melted butter and flour using a whisk over medium heat for 3-5 minutes. Stir constantly and slowly add the half-and-half (this is called making a roux). Add the vegetable stock whisking all the time. Simmer for 20 minutes.

Add the broccoli, carrots and onions. Cook over low heat until the veggies are tender for 20-25 minutes. Add salt and pepper. The soup should be thickened by now. Pour in batches into blender and puree. Return to pot over low heat and add the grated cheese; stir until well blended. Stir in the nutmeg and serve.

 

India Quality – Kenmore Square

I said previously that I’ve been expanding my cooking repertoire outside the bounds of traditional Indian cooking, but I should have specified that my family comes the state of Karnataka in South India.  This restaurant, located conveniently at the east end of the Boston University campus serves North Indian cuisine, but both vegetarian and non-vegetarian.  I find restaurants with a good selection of both food styles great because there’s something forever.

The vegetarian selection is what one would expect at an Indian restaurant, and because I keep repeating my favorites, I haven’t yet tried all of the vegetarian options there.  They have over 10 different types of vegetable curry alone, as well as appetizers, specials, dinner plates, and a page of different indian breads.  The vegetable selections in the curry include potatoes, peas, spinach, chick peas, eggplant, mixed vegetables, cauliflower, and combinations of the above.  They offer at least 5 different types of naan (which is a pita-esque Indian bread) and they offer other breads as well.

The pricing is affordable for those living on a budget, especially college students. A meal for two including appetizers, two types of curry, two types of bread and a dessert will run you around $40, but that’s the amount of food I generally order for  four people.  My first couple of years here, I would go to India Quality for dinner at least twice a month – that’s not too hard on the wallet. I recommend India Quality for the college student who wants flavorful food with quick and attentive service but doesn’t want to break the bank.

%d bloggers like this: