Posts Tagged ‘boston’

Brown Sugar Cafe & “Paradise Garden”

Yesterday night, I went out to dinner, and I chose Brown Sugar Cafe mostly because I had a hunkering for Thai food and I hadn’t gone out for something other than the occasional sandwich from Subway in quite a while.  If you haven’t been to Brown Sugar Cafe yet, you really need to make it out there. They’ve got plenty of meat-filled options, so take anyone there. Because, they’ve also got plenty of vegetarian options.

What I love about asian restaurants is that anything can be made vegetarian (i.e. the meat can be left out).

Looking through their extensive menu, I spent way too much time trying to make a choice. I chose Vegetarian Thai Spring Rolls for our appetizer; it came in 6 pieces with the house turnip sauce.  For my entree, I ended up narrowing my choices down to Red Curry, Pad Thai, Vegetable Fried Rice, Vegetarian Curry (extra vegetables and red curry with coconut milk), and this intriguing dish from the “Vegetarian Corner” section of the menu called Paradise Garden.

Paradise Garden won.

So what is Paradise Garden?  It is sauteed zucchini, bamboo strips, summer squash, Thai eggplant, cauliflower, snow peas, broccoli, carrots, celery, green beans, baby corn, green & red peppers and sweet basil leaves in mild red curry sauce. I had them make it spicy, because I love my red curry spicy, and I substituted brown rice for the white rice (because I love brown rice with Southeast Asian cuisine.

I’m pretty sure this dish won because it guaranteed a high and varied vegetable content,  and I love vegetables. Especially in curry. Also, this dish did not have tofu or eggs.  I have never been able to find a tofu dish I like (and I will try everyone’s dish at least once).  Now that I’ve tried tofu a solid dozen times, I do not ever want to eat more tofu.  Eggs, I love, hard-boiled, scrambled, as omelettes, but never in my rice or noodles.

This is Paradise Garden. It was Paradise. It was a Garden of Delicious.

paradise garden

Before Pumpkins Disappear This Year … Soup!

Usually when people are sick, Americans think, have some chicken noodle soup, stay in bed, and drink tea. Well, what do you give a vegetarian as a get-well food?  Normally, I’ll go for any soup – creamy tomato & basil is the easiest to make – but this time, I decided I wanted something a little different.  (If you’re still aching for Creamy Tomato Soup, try this recipe from The Food Network. Don’t forget to substitute vegetable broth for the chicken broth.)

Here’s magic:

pumpkin soup Image Source.

Pumpkin [Noodle] Soup (Approx. 4 Servings)

  • 1 lb. peeled pumpkin
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 cups milk
  • Grated nutmeg, a pinch
  • 1.5 ounces of spaghetti broken into small pieces
  • 6 tablespoons Freshly Grated Parmesan
  • Salt & Pepper, freshly ground, to taste
  1. Chop the pumpkin into 1-inch cubes.
  2. Heat the butter in a saucepan.  Add the onion and cook on medium heat until it softens. ~7 minutes.
  3. Stir in the pumpkin pieces and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the water and cook until the pumpkin is soft. ~15 minutes. Then, remove from heat.
  5. Process the soup in a blender, then return to pan.
  6. Stir in milk and nutmeg, season with salt & pepper.  Bring soup back to boil.
  7. Stir in the broken spaghetti and cook till pasta is done. Stir in the Parmesan and sprinkle again with nutmeg.
  8. Serve while hot!
  • I was recently taught how to make a pumpkin pie using real pumpkin (as opposed to canned purée) and phyllo dough, which completely expanded my pumpkin recipe range. Have you ever tried making pumpkin soup before?
  • Do you have any alternate versions of this recipe?
  • What’s your favorite soup when you are sick?

Nachos Nachos Nachos!

It’s a Saturday night and I’ve a bunch of homework to do (I know, I know, most college students go out on Saturday nights … I’d prefer a movie or a nice book at home. Call me granny if you want to.), and of course I’m looking for every possible method of procrastination. I might call up my friend Karen to see if she wants to go to Sunset. Where we would get beer, but more importantly, nachos. Now, nachos could really mean any manner of things, but the nachos I’d get here are a vast improvement from the nachos I used to eat at Target when I was 6 years old.

Case in point:

1. Nachos at Target – Tasteless tortilla chips doused with heated queso. I’d get jalapeños on these nachos just because otherwise those nachos were boring…

2. South of the Border Fiesta Nachos at Sunset Grill & Tap / Sunset Cantina – Here’s the description, straight from the menu: Hot nachos topped with choice of chili (Vegetarian, Taco Beef Black Beans) , jalapenos, scallions, tomatoes, black olives, jack and cheddar cheeses, shredded lettuce, guacamole, sour cream and salsa.  You can get the guac, sour cream, and salsa on the side, and you can substitute BBQ pulled pork, or add in BBQ/Cajun/Buffalo chicken. Or something. Choose a meat if you don’t want vegetarian chili, basically. But if you’re reading this blog, you’re probably looking to keep the veggie.

While rooting around the interwebs, I found a blog titled El Tour Del Nacho, written by several students in Boston who made it their mission to try and rank nachos all around Boston.  While I’m appalled that they’d rank it as such – they give Sunset the Bronze Medal for most delicious Nachos. They hold fast to The Pour House as the Gold Medal Champion. However, they give you a comprehensive analysis on the nachos. If this seems excessive, you must be new to the area. Or not from the South.

3. Repeat mention: The OTHERSIDE Nachos – I’ve professed my love for these nachos before, on this blog, but here it is again: This plate of delicious starts with a bed of tortilla chips topped with melted cheddar, jalapeños, their homemade vegetarian chili and salsa.

If you’re at home and you’re strapped for ingredients, try this twist:

Simple Nachos

  • Shredded Parmesan Cheese
  • Scallions/Jalapeños
  • Tortilla Chips – Choose a brand that ISN’T Tostitos and you’re golden
  1. Sprinkle the cheese and scallions/jalapeños on the chips to your heart’s content.
  2. Microwave 30 seconds (or less if you’ve got a really powerful microwave. The cheese should not start bubbling.)
  3. Eat!
  • What are your thoughts?
  • Do you make nachos at home?
  • If so, what do you put on them?

Oatmeal Craisin White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Cookies

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, the National Eating Holiday, er, I mean, Day of Thanks (for tasty, tasty desserts, right?), here is a recipe for the delicious, delicious cookies that my friend Tim baked last night.  The inspiration came from a picture we saw ages ago on a website that is both a blessing and a curse to foodies like myself. FoodPornDaily. Have you heard of it? If not, go look now. Today’s picture is Chocolate Cake layered with Caramel, Peanut Butter, and Chocolate Mousse.

Christina and I supplied the oats, macadamia nuts, and wonderful company. (Right, Tim?) Disclaimer: The recipe below isn’t Tim’s.  If I can wrest that recipe from here, I’ll post it.

This recipe was taken off of  allrecipes.com  (Ocean Spray Oatmeal Craisin White Chocolate Chunk Cookies) and modified slightly.

cooookies

Oatmeal Craisin White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Cookies

Yields 2 1/2 dozen

  • 2/3 cup butter or margarine, softened
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 (6 ounce) package Ocean Spray® Craisins® Original Dried Cranberries
  • 2/3 cup white chocolate chunks or chips
  • 2/3 cup chopped Macadamia nuts
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Using an electric mixer, beat butter or margarine and sugar together in a medium mixing bowl until light and fluffy. Add eggs, mixing well. Combine oats, flour, baking soda and salt in a separate mixing bowl. Add to butter mixture in several additions, mixing well after each addition. Stir in dried cranberries and white chocolate chunks.
  3. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire rack.

And now, I am off to finish up my last class, do some housework and pack my things for my adventure to Tampa, Florida tomorrow! There will be sun and there will be happiness!  There will also be a post or several coming up while I’m at home, never fear!

Happy Thanksgiving Break!

  • What about you? Have you ever had these or similar cookies?
  • What’s your favorite type of cookies?
  • What is your favorite Thanksgiving dessert (aside from pumpkin or apple pies)?

Baked Vegetable Frittata

The Frittata.  When I was in Copenhagen this past summer, my friend Jason introduced me to this Italian vegetable and egg dish.  Since then, I’ve discovered  numerous recipes for making frittatas, realized that each calls for the vegetables to be cooked differently, the eggs to be poured in at different times, and for the dish to be baked or broiled or cooked differently.  Alton Brown of the Food Network has a carnivorous version of the frittata recipe, for those of you cooking for a mixed party.

Because it’s slightly different from the allrecipes.com Potato and Vegetable Frittata Recipe, I’m providing Jason’s frittata recipe, which in all honesty, knowing Jason, he probably improvised the majority of it.

Potato and Vegetable Frittata

  • Large Pyrex-style oven safe glassware
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup onion, sliced in rings
  • 1/2 cup diced green bell pepper
  • 1 zucchini, sliced in thin circles
  • 2 cups potatoes, sliced in thin circles
  • 1 cup fresh tomato, sliced in rings
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup whole milk
  • Salt and pepper , roughly ground from peppermill
  • Dried oregano
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Preheat your oven; set it to broil.
  2. On a frying pan, heat oil and saute the onions and garlic over a low heat until the onions begin turning clear and the garlic begins turning golden. Remove from the heat.
  3. Beat the eggs with the salt, pepper, oregano, and cayenne in a separate bowl.  Mix in milk and heavy cream.
  4. Arrange the vegetables in the Pyrex (ours was an oval shaped dish). Cover the bottom of the dish with one layer of potato circles, arranged in a spiral of overlapping potato slices. Next, layer the zucchini and tomatoes,  then pour the bell peppers over the tomatoes.  Take the onions and garlic off the pan and top off the vegetable stack.
  5. Pour the egg/milk mixture over the vegetables, leaving a 1/2 inch or an 1 inch between the top of your vegetables/eggs and the top of the dish.
  6. Sprinkle the mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses over the mixture.
  7. Place dish in the oven and let bake/broil for about 45 minutes.  I think it took an hour for our eggs to set completely in the middle, but it really depends on your oven.  Check the dish at 30 minutes, because it could be fully cooked.
  8. When the eggs are firm and have started to brown around the edges, remove from oven and check center of dish to see if it is fully cooked.
  9. Cut into wedges and serve with hot sauce.

Enjoy!

  • What about you? Have you ever made a frittata?
  • Did you roast the vegetables beforehand?
  • What side dishes do you usually serve with frittatas?

Basil, Oregano, & Garlic: Flavors of My Winter “Pasta Primavera”

primavera

After eating one too many meals out this week, I spent the entire BU vs. UNH Men’s Ice Hockey game Saturday night (-we won, 4-2!) getting progressively hungrier and wondering about what I could make for dinner. The contents of my fridge really need to be emptied before I skip town for Thanksgiving. I thought about what I had – zucchinis, peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic… Combining those ingredients with the Italian herbs I had in my spice cabinet, I put together my take on a pasta primavera … in the winter. (For those of you who don’t know, “primavera” means “spring” in Italian.)

Wintertime Pasta “Primavera”

  • 1 cup large shell pasta
  • Barilla Roasted Garlic Tomato Sauce
  • 1 Yellow Bell Pepper, chopped in long thin strips
  • 1 Zucchini, chopped in semicircles (width – a little thinner than a centimeter)
  • 1/2 large red onion, chopped in thin semicircles
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • Fresh Basil, garnish, optional
  • Dried Basil
  • Dried Oregano
  • Garlic Salt
  • Salt
  • Crushed red pepper
  • Olive oil
  1. Cook the pasta in a large saucepan until it is al-dente.
  2. Once the water for the pasta is boiling, cut the vegetables.
  3. Heat oil on a flat pan – enough for all of the vegetables – 3-4 tbsp, more if needed, then lower heat to medium
  4. Throw some garlic salt and basil on the oil as it heats up.  Once it starts to snap, add the onions and cook until they start to turn clear.
  5. Add more basil and some oregano as well as the bell peppers and mix thoroughly.
  6. Once the bell peppers begin to become tender, add the zucchini and some salt.  Cook 2-3 minutes.
  7. Add the tomatoes and crushed pepper and let cook until the tomatoes start to soften and liquidate.
  8. Add the tomato sauce, mixing until all of the vegetables are covered lightly. Let simmer until sauce is thoroughly heated or vegetables fully cooked.
  9. Drain the pasta and add to the pan with the vegetables. Toss together, turn off flame.  Let cool slightly, garnish with fresh basil, then serve.

This made about 2-3 servings, which was great because now I have leftovers for today. Yay!

  • What about you? What vegetables do you include in pasta dishes?
  • What spices do you use for Italian food?
  • What is your favorite type of tomato sauce? Or, do you like to make your own?

My Mom’s Homemade Vegetarian Chili

I’ve been blathering on about the delicious vegetarian chili at The OTHERSIDE Cafe on Newbury St., Sunset Grill & Tap in Allston, and randomly, if you’re in the area, or in the mood for a 3-4 hour drive from Boston – Crow’s Corner (Cafe/Bakery near Cavendish, VT).

Now I’ve finally gotten around to it: the source of my love for chili.  When I was little, we’d go to Sweet Tomatoes, which is an all-you-can-eat restaurant in Tampa, Florida.  I’m not sure if they have any locations outside of Florida, but if you’re ever in Tampa – go there! In the soup section of Sweet Tomatoes’ giant buffet, was a vegetarian chili dish.  It easily became my favorite in that section, but one day, they stopped making it vegetarian with, go figure, the addition of …you guessed it – chicken broth.

One day, my mom surprised me by making that dish I could no longer find while dining out – vegetarian chili.  Her recipe, which deviated from the Sweet Tomatoes recipe quite deliberately, was phenomenal.  I loved it even more than the chili I’d eat at Sweet Tomatoes, and since then it remains my favorite recipe and has quickly risen to the top of my list of comfort foods.

Here’s the secret:

Uma’s Vegetarian Chili

  • 1 large Potato
  • 1-2 Carrots
  • 1 can Black Beans
  • 1 can Red Kidney Beans
  • 1 large can whole tomatoes
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • French cut green beans
  • 1 Bell Pepper
  • 1 inch Ginger Root, finely chopped
  • Serrano Peppers, finely chopped (if you can handle the spice)
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • Tomato paste
  • Water
  • Lemon juice
  • Cumin powder
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper
  • Red chili powder
  • Fresh Cilantro
  • Corn chips – Fritos scoops are my favorite.
  • Sour Cream (If you like it – I’ve met many people in New England who don’t… boggles my mind.)
  1. Make paste with garlic, 1/4 of the onions, tomato paste, 1/2 cup water in a blender.
  2. Put the paste along with the rest of the onions in a large sauce pan and cook for 1-2 minutes
  3. Add all but the canned vegetables and 1 cup water/enough water to cover all of the vegetables and cook until all vegetables (especially carrots/potatoes – those are tough veggies) are al dente.
  4. Add canned vegetables and let simmer for 10-15 minutes
  5. Add 1 tbsp (or more, depends on taste) of each cumin and chili powders.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  The chili should be spicy/tangy, but make sure the spice doesn’t overpower the flavor of the vegetables.
  6. Garnish with chopped, fresh cilantro.
  7. Serve in large bowls with corn chips and sour cream.
  8. Enjoy!
  • Do you have your own chili recipe? How is it different?
  • My sister adds corn to her chili. What other vegetables do you think make a good chili?
  • Any questions about the flavor or consistency?

Newbury St. & Mass. Ave: The OTHERSIDE Cafe

It’s no wonder that this restaurant, which has been consistently ranked the best vegetarian food in Boston ranks at the top of my choices for dining out.  I have a promise with myself – every time I go to The OTHERSIDE Cafe, I choose something different on the menu.  Now, I’ve been in Boston for 3 years, it took me 1 year to find The OTHERSIDE, and since I’ve gone several times a semester.

That’s approximately 12-15 trips to The OTHERSIDE, you’d think I’d have run out of options by now, right? Wrong.

Here’s my breakdown of what’s tasty on The OTHERSIDE’S menu:

Appetizers

  1. OTHERSIDE Nachos – If you know me, you know I absolutely LOVE nachos (there’s going to be a post on nachos coming soon… I can feel it). This plate of delicious starts with a bed of tortilla chips topped with melted cheddar, jalapeños, their homemade vegetarian chili and salsa. It’s $8.00 and it took the combined efforts of me and two friends to finish this for lunch.
  2. Hummus Platter – Homemade hummus.  Usually I don’t even bother reading the rest, since homemade hummus pretty much rocks my world, but what follows deserves fair mention.  Imagine a heaping plate of tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, carrots, sprouts, and lavash bread.

Soups & Stews

  1. Our Own Vegetarian Chili – I love my mom’s chili, and I tend to compare what I find in restaurants to my mother’s chili, but The OTHERSIDE doesn’t disappoint.  This chili includes two ingredients I don’t generally put in my chili: corn and bulghur wheat.  They serve their chili in two sizes, cups and bowls,  with tortilla chips on the side.

Sandwiches & Wraps

  1. Hummus Wrap – This is the dish that makes me want to break my “order – something – different – each – time” rule.  They roll up onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, shredded carrots, sprouts, lettuce, and the homemade hummus in a delicious honey wheat wrap.  You can add tofu or tempeh to this wrap if that’s what you’re into… can’t say I’ll follow that lead, though. Despite the number of times it’s cooked for me, I cannot bring myself to enjoy the texture of either tofu or tempeh.
  2. Veggie Burrito – Remember the delicious vegetarian chili from earlier?  Add brown rice and cheddar cheese and wrap up the trio in a tortilla, and serve it on a plate with salsa, guacamole, and sour cream on the side.  Again, adding tofu is an option.
  3. Pressed Greek – Finally, I had the chance to try this sandwich.  It combined the deliciousness of a Greek salad (spinach, feta, onions, tomatoes (eek, I forgot to ask them to hold the tomatoes!), black olives, and roasted red peppers with the magic of pesto all combined and pressed on sliced focaccia bread.

Dessert

Sadly, they were out of apple pie (pie is seasonal) by the time I and my friend Jack showed up for dinner, so instead I had a vegan cheesecake, which was made with what tasted like an oreo crust.  It was surprisingly delicious though I could definitely tell that it didn’t taste like regular cheesecake.

cake

So… even though I haven’t even gotten into the breakfast menu, you have ample incentive to meander over to Newbury & Mass Ave.  Hit up The OTHERSIDE for a Saturday brunch.  Post-lunch, you can go shopping on Newbury Street!

  • Have you been to The OTHERSIDE?
  • What’s your favorite menu item?

Scrambled Eggs or Omelettes?

Vegetarians often have a huge problem with variable sources of protein, so growing up, my parents always stressed the importance of eating eggs and cheese.  Conveniently, I’m not a vegan – there’s nothing that could get me to give up ice cream, milk, quesadillas, scrambled eggs… and the list goes on.

Backing up to the scrambled eggs, let’s talk about more breakfast options.  I have to be in the mood to eat eggs, but once I get into the mood, I love them cooked in several different ways.  However, my favorite has to be two classics: scrambled eggs and omelettes. I’ve experimented over the years with different types of cheese, different combinations of vegetables, and different ways of cooking the vegetables. I’ve also switched to Egg Beaters (egg substitute in a carton) instead of real eggs in order to keep my cholesterol in the normal to low range.  Yes, I realize I’m 21, and I also realize that most people don’t worry about cholesterol at this age.  Genetics, however, likes to spite me, and I’m reminded that high cholesterol tends to run in my family and that my father had his own fight to bring down his cholesterol levels several years ago.

Because I don’t want to go on a seriously restricted diet and take medicines in 5 or 10 years to combat this unnecessary sign of aging, I watch my cholesterol intake carefully.  So long as I avoid fast foods – done easily as most restaurants don’t use different frying oil for say french fries or chicken fingers (take Rhett’s, located in the Boston University George Sherman Union, for example) and most don’t section off their grills when cooking hamburgers and veggie burgers (UBurger, and I’m sure many others I’m unaware of) – and maintain awareness of how I cook my foods, I know I’ll be fine.

Sorry about the cholesterol tangent – back to eggs.

Step 1: Choose your eggs

  • Real Eggs (I grew up eating white eggs in FL, but my friend Karen grew up in MA eating brown eggs… so it’s really personal preference. I’ve never noticed a difference in taste.)
  • Egg Beaters (egg substitute)
  • Egg Whites

Because Martha Stewart would disprove of any method otherwise, if I’m cooking with real eggs, I’ll always beat them with a whisk, and never with a fork.  I add a little milk to make the eggs lighter and fluffier (amount variable, never more than 1/4 cup per 2 eggs), salt and pepper.  I like to use a spice grinder with a coarse setting, otherwise I feel the eggs drown out the flavor of the pepper.

Step 2: Choose your grease

Okay, that’s not as gross as it may have sounded. Unless you have a large egg skillet – mine is really only large enough to fry an egg on – or a nonstick pan, you’ll want to grease the pan before cooking the eggs. Otherwise, they’ll stick and they’ll burn and your whole place of residence will reek of eggs.  These are my usual options:

  • PAM cooking spray – this is the low cholesterol, flavor-retaining option.  Don’t overdo the spraying though, or you WILL taste the PAM, and trust me that’s gross. Dab the pan with a paper towel once you’ve sprayed it to make sure you’ve just coated the pan lightly.
  • Butter – real butter, on a stick.  You don’t need to cover the whole pan, just run the stick over the surface of the pan lightly in a zig-zag method.  Remember when you’d use a glue-stick in elementary school to paste something onto paper? Same idea.
  • Spreadable butter – place a pat of butter on the pan, turn on the stove, and as the butter melts, slowly lift and rotate the pan to spread the butter.
  • Margarine – I really dislike that margarine is high in trans fat, so I only use it if I have nothing else.  And usually, I don’t have margarine anyway.

Step 3: Choose your cheese

  • My favorite: Grated sharp or extra-sharp cheddar.  I love the flavor of cheddar and sharp/extra-sharp stands out against the flavor of the eggs.
  • Kraft Mexican Blend
  • Grated mild cheddar
  • Cheddar & Monterey Jack
  • Swiss

Step 4: Choose your veggies

This step is wholly dependent on personal preferences, but here’s the assortment of veggies I love to choose from.  Several friends of mine love to roast their veggies first before putting them in the omelette, but I prefer them fresh, thrown into the omelette/scrambled eggs halfway through cooking the eggs.

  • Diced red onions – yellow onions work too, obviously. I just like the color of the red onions.
  • Diced bell peppers – choose a mix of colors.  Orange peppers are pretty.
  • Diced tomatoes – yes, coming from the girl who doesn’t really like raw tomatoes.
  • Sliced black olives – I dislike green olives, but if you don’t, go for it.
  • Diced zucchini
  • Chopped broccoli
  • Fresh spinach

I never put in all of these veggies at once, though it would probably still taste good if I did. The last three, I would probably roast a little before adding them to the eggs, because they tend to be tougher vegetables if uncooked and the texture would contrast a little too strongly with the eggs.

Step 5: Cook it!

Before you begin doing anything with the eggs – put the toast in your toaster! For toast options, see my breakfast post from November 4th.

My first instinct is to assume everyone knows how to cook eggs, but assumptions are dangerous.  So here’s a short crash course on cooking eggs.  Whether scrambling or making omelettes, crack your eggs on the side of the bowl or edge of the counter and open them up into a bowl.  Add salt, pepper and milk. I also add crushed red pepper, but only add that if you can handle the spice.

Whisk using a whisk if your like your eggs properly beaten or beat with a wooden spoon if you like the white/yellow mix of color more distinct in your eggs. Turn your stove on and grease the pan with your choice from Step 2 above.

Once the pan is warmed up, pour in your egg mixture and let sit for a minute. Make sure you keep the stove flame on low/medium otherwise the eggs won’t cook from the inside out and you will burn your mixture.

Scrambled eggs

As the eggs start to whiten and solidify on the bottom, start moving them in the pan with a flat spoon or spatula.  The trick is not to let the eggs stick or sit for too long.  You can flip the eggs as they begin to fluff up to make sure they’re cooked evenly.  When the eggs are 2/3 cooked, add in the veggies so they cook a little with the eggs.  Just before you remove the eggs from the pan, add in the cheese and mix into the eggs thoroughly so the cheese melts.

Here’s a short YouTube clip from One Pot Chef, an Australian guy who simplifies cooking in an easy-to-follow manner:

Omelette

As the eggs start to whiten and solidify on the bottom, move the eggs gently from the outside edge toward the middle and tilt the pan in the direction of your flat spoon/spatula so the still-runny part of the mixture moves off the top of the solidifying eggs and fills in the space you create on the outside.

When no more runny mixture remains but the eggs are still whitish, flip the pancake-shaped eggs and let the top cook for a minute.  Sprinkle your veggies and eggs on top and fold over the eggs like a quesadilla. Let cook another minute or two, but don’t let it burn.

Place the toast and eggs on a plate, put some ketchup or hot sauce on those eggs and enjoy!

P.S. Cholula hot sauce is the best.

Coconut Curry Butternut Squash Soup

Once again, I have a craving for soup, but this time I want something different.  (I also may have made broccoli for dinner two nights ago, eaten cheese as my mid-afternoon snack and have bored myself of these two ingredients. Shhhh…)  Courtesy of my friend Christina,  I present to you an excellent recipe for Butternut Squash Soup (For all you BU students reading this, Copper Kettle in the George Sherman Union makes a delicious vegetarian butternut squash soup.)

S0, for dinner this Saturday night, this soup is what I’m making:

Coconut Curry Butternut Squash Soup from Gina’s Weight Watcher Recipes

  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp roasted cumin
  • 1 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 2 tsp madras curry powder
  • 1/2 medium onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 16 oz (about 2 cups) chopped peeled butternut squash
  • 1 cup light coconut milk
  • 3 cups fat free vegetable
  • salt and fresh pepper to taste (1/4 tsp salt + pepper)
  • chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

Directions:

Add oil to a medium soup pot, on medium heat. When oil is hot add onion, garlic and sauté. Add roasted cumin, masala and madras curry powder and mix well cooking another minute. Add broth, light coconut milk, butternut squash and cook covered until squash is soft, 12-15 minutes. Remove cover and using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth (or puree in a blender). Season with salt and fresh pepper and serve with fresh cilantro. Serves 3.

As promised, those ingredients with the funny names (i.e. the Indian spices are all available at Shaws/Star Market – look in the Indian food section if you don’t see them in the spice aisle.  If you’re still having trouble finding them, go over to Allston Market at the intersection of Commonwealth Avenue and Harvard St. across the street from Wonderbar – they have everything there.)

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